Paying the Bills: Potential Sources of Retirement Income

Planning your retirement income is like putting together a puzzle with many different pieces. One of the first steps in the process is to identify all potential income sources and estimate how much you can expect each one to provide.

Social Security

According to the Social Security Administration (SSA), almost 9 of 10 people aged 65 or older receive Social Security benefits. However, most retirees also rely on other sources of income.

For a rough estimate of the annual benefit to which you would be entitled at various retirement ages, you can use the calculator on the Social Security website, http://www.ssa.gov. Your Social Security retirement benefit is calculated using a formula that takes into account your 35 highest earnings years. How much you receive ultimately depends on a number of factors, including when you start taking benefits. You can begin doing so as early as age 62. However, your benefit may be 20% to 30% less than if you waited until full retirement age (65 to 67, depending on the year you were born). Benefits increase each year that you delay taking benefits until you reach age 70.

As you’re planning, remember that the question of how Social Security will meet its long-term obligations to both baby boomers and later generations has become a hot topic of discussion. Concerns about the system’s solvency indicate that there’s likely to be a change in how those benefits are funded, administered, and/or taxed over the next 20 or 30 years. That may introduce additional uncertainty about Social Security’s role as part of your overall long-term retirement income picture, and put additional emphasis on other potential income sources.

Pensions

If you are entitled to receive a traditional pension, you’re lucky; fewer Americans are covered by them every year. Be aware that even if you expect pension payments, many companies are changing their plan provisions. Ask your employer if your pension will increase with inflation, and if so, how that increase is calculated.

Your pension will most likely be offered as either a single or a joint and survivor annuity. A single annuity provides benefits until the worker’s death; a joint and survivor annuity provides reduced benefits that last until the survivor’s death. The law requires married couples to take a joint and survivor annuity unless the spouse signs away those rights. Consider rejecting it only if the surviving spouse will have income that equals at least 75% of the current joint income. Be sure to fully plan your retirement budget before you make this decision.

Work or other income-producing activities

Many retirees plan to work for at least a while in their retirement years at part-time work, a fulfilling second career, or consulting or freelance assignments. Obviously, while you’re continuing to earn, you’ll rely less on your savings, leaving more to accumulate for the future. Work also may provide access to affordable health care.

Be aware that if you’re receiving Social Security benefits before you reach your full retirement age, earned income may affect the amount of your benefit payments until you do reach full retirement age.

If you’re covered by a pension plan, you may be able to retire, then seek work elsewhere. This way, you might be able to receive both your new salary and your pension benefit from your previous employer at the same time. Also, some employers have begun to offer phased retirement programs, which allow you to receive all or part of your pension benefit once you’ve reached retirement age, while you continue to work part-time for the same employer.

Other possible resources include rental property income and royalties from existing assets, such as intellectual property.

Retirement savings/investments

Until now, you may have been saving through retirement accounts such as IRAs, 401(k)s, or other tax-advantaged plans, as well as in taxable accounts. Your challenge now is to convert your savings into ongoing income. There are many ways to do that, including periodic withdrawals, choosing an annuity if available, increasing your allocation to income-generating investments, or using some combination. Make sure you understand the tax consequences before you act.

Some of the factors you’ll need to consider when planning how to tap your retirement savings include:

  • How much you can afford to withdraw each year without exhausting your nest egg. You’ll need to take into account not only your projected expenses and other income sources, but also your asset allocation, your life expectancy, and whether you expect to use both principal and income, or income alone.
  • The order in which you will tap various accounts. Tax considerations can affect which account you should use first, and which you should defer using.
  • How you’ll deal with required minimum distributions (RMDs) from certain tax-advantaged accounts. After age 70½, if you withdraw less than your RMD, you’ll pay a penalty tax equal to 50% of the amount you failed to withdraw.

Some investments, such as certain types of annuities, are designed to provide a guaranteed monthly income (subject to the claims-paying ability of the issuer). Others may pay an amount that varies periodically, depending on how your investments perform. You also can choose to balance your investment choices to provide some of both types of income.

Inheritance

One widely cited study by economists John Havens and Paul Schervish forecasts that by 2052, at least $41 trillion will have been transferred from World War II’s Greatest Generation to their descendants. (Source: “Why the $41 Trillion Wealth Transfer Is Still Valid.”) An inheritance, whether anticipated or in hand, brings special challenges. If a potential inheritance has an impact on your anticipated retirement income, you might be able to help your parents investigate estate planning tools that can minimize the impact of taxes on their estate. Your retirement income also may be affected by whether you hope to leave an inheritance for your loved ones. If you do, you may benefit from specialized financial planning advice that can integrate your income needs with a future bequest.

Equity in your home or business

If you have built up substantial home equity, you may be able to tap it as a source of retirement income. Selling your home, then downsizing or buying in a lower-cost region, and investing that freed-up cash to produce income or to be used as needed is one possibility. Another is a reverse mortgage, which allows you to continue to live in your home while borrowing against its value. That loan and any accumulated interest is eventually repaid by the last surviving borrower when he or she eventually sells the home, permanently vacates the property, or dies. (However, you need to carefully consider the risks and costs before borrowing. A useful publication titled “Reverse Mortgages: Avoiding a Reversal of Fortune” is available online from the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority.)

If you’re hoping to convert an existing business into retirement income, you may benefit from careful financial planning to minimize the tax impact of a sale. Also, if you have partners, you’ll likely need to make sure you have a buy-sell agreement that specifies what will happen to the business when you retire and how you’ll be compensated for your interest.

With an expert to help you identify and analyze all your potential sources of retirement income, you may discover you have more options than you realize.

According to the Social Security Administration, more than 70% of Americans choose to take early Social Security benefits rather than wait until full retirement age.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This material was prepared by Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of Albert Aizin, and The Retirement Group or FSC Financial Corp. This information should not be construed as investment advice. Neither the named Representatives nor Broker/Dealer gives tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If other expert assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. Please consult your Financial Advisor for further information or call 800-900-5867.

The Retirement Group is not affiliated with nor endorsed by fidelity.com, netbenefits.fidelity.com, hewitt.com, resources.hewitt.com, access.att.com, ING Retirement, AT&T, Qwest, Chevron, Hughes, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, ExxonMobil, Glaxosmithkline, Merck, Pfizer, Verizon, Bank of America, Alcatel-Lucent or by your employer. We are an independent financial advisory group that specializes in transition planning and lump sum distribution. Please call our office at 800-900-5867 if you have additional questions or need help in the retirement planning process.

Albert Aizin is a Representative with FSC Securities and may be reached at www.theretirementgroup.com.

Stretch IRAs

The term “stretch IRA” has become a popular way to refer to an IRA (either traditional or Roth) with provisions that make it easier to “stretch out” the time that funds can stay in your IRA after your death, even over several generations. It’s not a special IRA, and there’s nothing dramatic about this “stretch” language. Any IRA can include stretch provisions, but not all do.

 

Why is “stretching” important?

 Earnings in an IRA grow tax deferred. Over time, this tax-deferred growth can help you accumulate significant retirement funds. If you’re able to support yourself in retirement without the need to tap into your IRA, you may want to continue this tax-deferred growth for as long as possible. In fact, you may want your heirs to benefit–to the greatest extent possible–from this tax-deferred growth as well. But funds can’t stay in your IRA forever. Required minimum distribution (RMD) rules will apply after your death (for traditional IRAs, minimum distributions are also required during your lifetime after you reach age 70½). The goal of a stretch IRA is to make sure your beneficiary can take distributions over the maximum period the RMD rules allow. You’ll want to check your IRA custodial or trust agreement carefully to make sure that it contains the following important stretch provisions.

 

Key stretch provision #1

 The RMD rules let your beneficiary take distributions from an inherited IRA over a fixed period of time, based on your beneficiary’s life expectancy. For example, if your beneficiary is age 20 in the year following your death, he or she can take payments over 63 additional years (special rules apply to spousal beneficiaries).

 

As you can see, this rule can keep your IRA funds growing tax deferred for a very long time. But even though the RMD rules allow your beneficiary to “stretch out” payments over his or her life expectancy, your particular IRA may not. For example, your IRA might require your beneficiary to take a lump-sum payment, or receive payments within five years after your death. Make sure your IRA contract lets your beneficiary take payments over his or her life expectancy.

 

Key stretch provision #2

 But what happens if your beneficiary elects to take distributions over his or her life expectancy but dies a few years later, with funds still in the inherited IRA? This is where the IRA language becomes crucial. If, as is commonly the case, the IRA language doesn’t address what happens when your beneficiary dies, then the IRA balance is typically paid to your beneficiary’s estate. However, IRA providers are increasingly allowing an original beneficiary to name a successor beneficiary. In this case, if your original beneficiary dies, the successor beneficiary “steps into the shoes” of your original beneficiary and can continue to take RMDs over the original beneficiary’s remaining distribution schedule.

 

What if your IRA doesn’t stretch?

 You can always transfer your funds to an IRA that contains the desired stretch language. In addition, upon your death, your beneficiary can transfer the IRA funds (in your name) directly to another IRA that has the appropriate language.

 

And if your spouse is your beneficiary, he or she can roll over the IRA assets to his or her own IRA, or elect to treat your IRA as his or her own (if your spouse is your sole beneficiary). Because your spouse becomes the owner of your IRA funds, rather than a beneficiary, your spouse won’t have to start taking distributions until he or she reaches age 70½. And your spouse can name a new beneficiary to continue receiving payments after your spouse dies.

 

Stretching your IRA–a case study

 Jack dies at age 78 with an IRA worth $500,000. He had named his surviving spouse, 69-year-old Mary, as his sole beneficiary. Mary elects to roll over the funds to her own IRA. Mary names Susan, her 44-year-old daughter, as her beneficiary. At age 70½, Mary begins taking required minimum distributions over a period determined from the Uniform Lifetime Table. (Mary is allowed to recalculate her life expectancy each year.) At age 79, Mary dies and Susan begins taking required distributions over Susan’s life expectancy–29.6 years (fixed in the year following Mary’s death). Susan names Jon, her 30-year-old son, as her successor beneficiary. Susan dies at age 70 after receiving payments for 16 years, and Jon continues receiving required distributions over Susan’s remaining life expectancy (13.6 years).

 

Year 1 Mary becomes owner of Jack’s IRA
Year 3 Mary begins taking distributions at age 70½ over her life expectancy
Year 12 Susan begins taking distributions the year after Mary’s death over Susan’s life expectancy
Year 28 Jon begins taking distributions over Susan’s remaining life expectancy
Year 40 All of Jack’s IRA funds have been distributed

 

Under this scenario, total payments of over $2 million are made over 40 years, to three generations.

 

Note: Payments from a traditional IRA will generally be subject to income tax at the beneficiary’s tax rate. Qualified distributions from a Roth IRA are tax free.

 

Assumptions:

 

  • This is a hypothetical example and is not intended to reflect the actual performance of any specific investment portfolio, nor is it an estimate or guarantee of future value.

 

  • This illustration assumes a fixed 6% annual rate of return; the rate of return on your actual investment portfolio will be different, and will vary over time, according to actual market performance. This is particularly true for long-term investments. It is important to note that investments offering the potential for higher rates of return also involve a higher degree of risk to principal.

 

  • All earnings are reinvested, and all distributions are taken at year-end.

 

  • The projected figures assume that Mary takes the smallest distribution she’s allowed to take under IRS rules at the latest possible time without penalty.

 

  • The projected figures assume that tax law and IRS rules will remain constant throughout the life of the IRA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This material was prepared by Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of Albert Aizin, and The Retirement Group or FSC Financial Corp. This information should not be construed as investment advice. Neither the named Representatives nor Broker/Dealer gives tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If other expert assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. Please consult your Financial Advisor for further information or call 800-900-5867.

The Retirement Group is not affiliated with nor endorsed by fidelity.com, netbenefits.fidelity.com, hewitt.com, resources.hewitt.com, access.att.com, ING Retirement, Raytheon, AT&T, Qwest, Chevron, Hughes, Northrop Grumman, ExxonMobil, Glaxosmithkline, Pfizer, Verizon, Merck, Bank of America, Alcatel-Lucent or by your employer. We are an independent financial advisory group that specializes in transition planning and lump sum distribution. Please call our office at 800-900-5867 if you have additional questions or need help in the retirement planning process.

Albert Aizin is a Representative with FSC Securities and may be reached at www.theretirementgroup.com.

Disaster Preparedness for Businesses

As a successful business owner, you don’t want to think about your operations being interrupted by a natural disaster or other unexpected event. Yet the possibility is a real one.

 

According to the Insurance Information Institute, 80 natural disasters occurred in the United States in the first half of 2015, totaling $12.6 billion in losses. But natural disasters represent just a portion of the crises that your business could face. Although you may not be located in an area prone to hurricanes, blizzards, tornadoes, floods, earthquakes, mudslides, or wildfires, you still need to consider the possibility of power outages, civil unrest, terrorism, cyber attacks, fire, data breaches, illness epidemics, and other potential hazards. Fortunately, there are many ways you can prepare your business for an emergency.

 

How businesses are affected by natural disasters

 

As reported by preparemybusiness.org, a website created by the Small Business Administration (SBA) and Agility Recovery Solutions, approximately 40% to 60% of small businesses never recover from a disaster. For this reason, it is in the best interest of every business to identify potential risks and develop a plan to address them–before a crisis hits. Many resources are available to assist business owners in developing a disaster preparedness program.

 

What is a disaster preparedness program?

 

A disaster preparedness program is a plan, either self-directed or guided by an organization, that enables business owners to prepare themselves, their employees, and their businesses for the possibility of a natural or man-made disaster. Organizations such as the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Small Business Administration (SBA), and state governments provide disaster assistance for damages to small businesses located in declared disaster areas.

 

Steps to implement a disaster preparedness program

 

Following are five steps that will help you create a disaster preparedness program, as outlined by ready.gov, a national public service campaign designed to educate Americans about preparing for and responding to natural and man-made disasters.

 

Step 1: Program Management. In many cases, there are minimum regulations that govern how certain businesses manage risk, but as a business owner you will need to determine whether the minimums are enough. As ready.gov states, “Many risks cannot be insured, so a preparedness program may be the only means of managing those risks.” Management commitment to a preparedness program, as well as a written preparedness policy and oversight committee, may be critical to ensuring your business’s longevity.

 

Step 2: Planning. This step should include the creation of a “risk assessment” that identifies all potential risks and hazards for your business, with ideas for mitigating their impact. It should highlight threats and hazards that are considered “probable,” as well as any that could cause injury, property damage, business disruption, or environmental impact. Another critical document is the “business impact analysis,” which details sensitive or critical processes as well as the financial and operational impacts that would occur due to disruption of those processes.

 

Step 3: Implementation. In this step, committee members identify and assess resources, draft written plans, develop a system to manage incidents, and train employees as needed. Several key documents contribute to successful program implementation, including crisis communications, emergency response, and business continuity plans.

 

Step 4: Testing & Exercises. To evaluate the program’s effectiveness, including the success of employee training, management should run tests and drills to see what works and note opportunities for improvement.

 

Step 5: Program Improvement. During testing or an actual incident, weaknesses in the program are likely to be revealed. They should be documented, along with lessons learned and strategies for addressing such problems in the future.

 

Other disaster preparedness resources

 

The Small Business Administration (sba.gov) offers a number of resources designed to help small businesses shore up their emergency preparedness, including links to templates and worksheets that will help you gather the data you need to put together the various written documents. The SBA’s Disaster Preparedness and Recovery Plan outlines the various ways in which the SBA can assist businesses recovering from disasters.

 

The SBA’s main form of support for businesses is the Disaster Loan Program. The organization has two types of disaster loans designed specifically for small business owners:

 

  • The SBA Business Physical Disaster Loan provides loans of up to $2 million to help businesses and nonprofit organizations within a disaster area repair and replace real property, machinery, equipment, fixtures, and leasehold improvements.

 

  • The Economic Injury Disaster Loan offers up to $2 million in loans to help small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, and certain nonprofit organizations that suffer substantial economic distress because of a disaster. Loan proceeds can be used to meet financial obligations and working capital needs that could have been met if a disaster had not occurred.

 

As of March 2015, the SBA had approved nearly 2 million disaster loans for more than $53 billion. But the SBA is only one organization that offers resources designed to help small businesses prepare for and recover from disasters.

 

The American Red Cross also provides resources for small businesses that are preparing for the possibility of disasters and emergencies. American Red Cross Ready Rating™(readyrating.org) is a self-guided online program designed to help member businesses, organizations, and schools assess their level of emergency preparedness. The core of the program is a 123-point assessment that is used to gauge one’s level of preparedness. Members also have access to a variety of online tools and resources to help create and refine a disaster preparedness plan. Examples include a hazard vulnerability assessment worksheet, an emergency response notification procedures document, and a damage assessment form.

 

Preparemybusiness.org hosts a variety of sources on disaster preparedness for business owners, including:

 

  • Downloadable educational information on how to prepare your business for a disaster

 

  • An archive of webinars to help you plan your disaster preparedness and recovery strategy

 

  • A framework of testing strategies to implement in order to assess your disaster preparedness

 

  • Resources from the SBA on the types of disaster assistance available to businesses

 

Finally, the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety (disastersafety.org) offers a variety of resources, including research reports and an online tool that allows you to enter your Zip code and receive information about specific risks in your area.

 

Disasters are unpredictable, and they can put you, your employees, and your business in jeopardy. But many of their worst effects can be prevented, or at least mitigated, through a structured disaster management plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This material was prepared by Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of Albert Aizin, and The Retirement Group or FSC Financial Corp. This information should not be construed as investment advice. Neither the named Representatives nor Broker/Dealer gives tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If other expert assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. Please consult your Financial Advisor for further information or call 800-900-5867.

The Retirement Group is not affiliated with nor endorsed by fidelity.com, netbenefits.fidelity.com, hewitt.com, resources.hewitt.com, ING Retirement, AT&T, Qwest, Raytheon, Chevron, Hughes, Northrop Grumman, ExxonMobil, Glaxosmithkline, Merck, access.att.com, Pfizer, Verizon, Bank of America, Alcatel-Lucent or by your employer. We are an independent financial advisory group that specializes in transition planning and lump sum distribution. Please call our office at 800-900-5867 if you have additional questions or need help in the retirement planning process.

Albert Aizin is a Representative with FSC Securities and may be reached at www.theretirementgroup.com.

Use Your Annuity to Pay for Long-Term Care Insurance

The cost of long-term care can quickly deplete your savings and affect the quality of life for you and your family. Long-term care insurance allows you to share that cost with an insurance company. But premiums for long-term care insurance can be expensive, and cash or income to cover those premiums may not be readily available. One option is to exchange your annuity contract for a long-term care insurance policy.

Section 1035 exchange

Generally, withdrawals from a nonqualified deferred annuity (premiums paid with after-tax dollars) are considered to come first from earnings, then from your investment (premiums paid) in the contract. The earnings portion of the withdrawal is treated as income to the annuity owner, subject to ordinary income taxes. IRC Section 1035 allows you to exchange one annuity for another without any immediate tax consequences, as long as certain requirements are met. However, prior to 2010, an annuity couldn’t be exchanged for a long-term care insurance policy on a tax-free basis. But the Pension Protection Act (PPA) changed that and, as of January 1, 2010, both life insurance and annuities may be exchanged, tax free, for qualified long-term care insurance.

Conditions for tax-free exchange

In order for the transfer of the annuity to the long-term care insurance policy to be treated as a tax-free exchange, certain conditions must be met:

  • The annuity must be nonqualified, meaning it cannot be part of an employer-sponsored retirement plan. For example, a tax-sheltered annuity or an annuity used to fund an IRA would not qualify for tax-free exchange treatment.
  • The long-term care insurance policy must meet the requirements of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA) and IRS criteria. Generally, the long-term care insurance policy must provide coverage only for qualified long-term care services; it must be guaranteed renewable; it cannot have a cash surrender value; refunds or dividends can only be used to reduce future premiums; and policy benefits cannot pay for expenses covered by Medicare (except where Medicare is a secondary payee).
  • The exchange must be made directly from the annuity issuer to the long-term care insurance company. You will not receive tax-free treatment if you withdraw funds from the annuity directly, then use them to pay the long-term care insurance premium.

Presuming these criteria are met, exchanging an annuity for a long-term care policy can be done in one of two ways: a full transfer of the entire cash surrender value of the annuity in exchange for the long-term care insurance policy; or partial exchanges of the annuity’s cash value for the long-term care policy. Not all insurance companies allow long-term care policies to be funded with a single, lump-sum payment, so the more common approach may be to pay long-term care insurance premiums through several partial exchanges from the annuity.

Potential tax advantages

Exchanging your nonqualified deferred annuity for a long-term care insurance policy may have several tax-related advantages. You can use annuity earnings to pay for long-term care insurance without paying income tax on those earnings. This allows you to use otherwise taxable annuity earnings in a more tax-efficient manner.

According to the IRS, Section 1035 exchanges from a nonqualified annuity to pay for tax-qualified long-term care insurance are pro-rated based on the comparative percentages of principal and earnings in the annuity. For example, say you have a nonqualified annuity worth $100,000, which includes your premium of $50,000, plus earnings worth $50,000, and you haven’t taken any previous withdrawals. You direct the annuity issuer to send $2,500 to the long-term care insurance carrier as a partial exchange to pay for insurance premiums. Your annuity cash value is reduced by $2,500, but half of that amount ($1,250) comes from earnings. As a result, not only have you withdrawn annuity earnings ($1,250) without paying taxes on them, but you have further reduced the taxable portion of your annuity by $1,250. By withdrawing earnings from your annuity to pay for long-term care insurance, you could reduce the taxable portion of your annuity, which can be important if you surrender the annuity later.

Another advantage relates to the long-term care insurance policy. Generally, a qualified long-term care insurance policy is treated as an accident and health insurance contract, and the benefits are typically treated as tax free, subject to certain limits. In this way, you may be able to use tax-free annuity earnings to pay for tax-free long-term care benefits.

Other possible benefits

Aside from the favorable tax treatment, there may be other benefits as well.

  • Using an annuity to pay for long-term care insurance may lessen the need to tap other savings or income to pay for premiums.
  • You may still use any remaining cash surrender value of the annuity for other income needs or expenses.
  • Exchanging the annuity for long-term care insurance may better meet your current needs, financial situation, and preferences.

Some potential disadvantages

There are also some potential disadvantages to exchanging an annuity for long-term care insurance.

  • Annuity surrender charges might be incurred on the exchange of the annuity, thus reducing the annuity’s value.
  • Reducing the annuity’s value to pay for long-term care insurance premiums may reduce your ability to use the annuity to provide income needed in the future.
  • Some nonqualified deferred annuities might not be eligible for a partial Section 1035 exchange because the annuity contracts may not allow annuity payments to be made to other than the annuity owner (e.g., annuity payments cannot be assigned to another payee).
  • If you exchange the annuity for a long-term care insurance policy, your survivors won’t have the annuity’s cash value for income or savings that otherwise would have been available at your death.
  • Generally, premiums for qualified long-term care insurance are deductible as qualified medical expenses subject to certain restrictions. The tax savings of using a tax-free Section 1035 exchange needs to be compared to available federal or state income tax deductions for long-term care insurance premiums. Depending on your situation, it might be more beneficial to deduct premiums and include annuity earnings as taxable income.

Frequently asked questions

If I am the sole owner of the annuity, can I exchange it for a long-term care insurance policy jointly owned by my spouse and me?

Generally, no, because the owners of both the annuity and the long-term care insurance policy must be the same. However, you may be able to change the ownership of your annuity to include your spouse. While changing ownership of an annuity is generally treated as a taxable event to the extent of gain (earnings) in the annuity, ownership changes between spouses are typically tax free, but be sure to consult your tax or financial professional before making ownership changes to your annuity.

I’m receiving payments from a nonqualified immediate annuity. Can I exchange these payments for long-term care insurance?

You may be able to assign the payments directly to the long-term care insurance company as a 1035 exchange, but the annuity payee must be the long-term care insurance company–if you’re listed as the payee, payments will not receive tax-free treatment. Also, be aware that if long-term care insurance premiums increase, the annuity payments may not be sufficient to cover the cost of the long-term care insurance premiums. Also, if the annuity payment exceeds the insurance premium, you may be able to split the annuity payment, where an amount equal to the insurance premium is sent to the long-term care insurance company and the balance of the annuity payment is sent to you, but this would be at the discretion of the annuity issuer.

Can I use more than one annuity to pay for long-term care insurance?

Generally, yes, because funds from one or more nonqualified annuities can be exchanged for a long-term care insurance policy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This material was prepared by Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of Albert Aizin, and The Retirement Group or FSC Financial Corp. This information should not be construed as investment advice. Neither the named Representatives nor Broker/Dealer gives tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If other expert assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. Please consult your Financial Advisor for further information or call 800-900-5867.

The Retirement Group is not affiliated with nor endorsed by fidelity.com, netbenefits.fidelity.com, hewitt.com, resources.hewitt.com, Hughes, access.att.com, ING Retirement, AT&T, Qwest, Chevron, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, ExxonMobil, Merck, Pfizer, Glaxosmithkline, Verizon, Bank of America, Alcatel-Lucent or by your employer. We are an independent financial advisory group that specializes in transition planning and lump sum distribution. Please call our office at 800-900-5867 if you have additional questions or need help in the retirement planning process.

Albert Aizin is a Representative with FSC Securities and may be reached at www.theretirementgroup.com.