Women and Money Paralysis

Not making a move may not be the best move to make.      

A decision not made may have financial consequences. There is an old belief that women are more cautious about money than men, and whether you believe that or not, both women and men may fall prey to a kind of money paralysis as they age – in which financial indecision is regarded as a form of “safety.”  

Retirement seems to heighten this tendency. If you are single, retired, and female, you may be extremely fearful of drawing down your retirement savings too soon; or investing in a way that would mean any kind of risk.

This is understandable: if you are over 80, you likely have memories of the Great Depression, and baby boomers have memories of the severe economic downturn of the late 2000s.

“Paralysis by analysis,” or simple hesitation, may cost you in the long run. Your retirement may last much longer than you presume it will – perhaps 30 or 40 years – and maintaining your standard of living will undeniably take some growth investing. As much as you may want to stay out of stocks and funds, they offer you a chance to out-earn inflation – a chance you forfeit at your financial peril.

Even minor inflation can subtly reduce your purchasing power over time. Of all the risks to quality of life in retirement, this is often the least noticed. Doing nothing about it – or investing in a way that avoids all or nearly all risk – may put you at greater and greater financial disadvantage as your retirement proceeds. 

Keeping a foot in the stock market – in whatever major or minor way you choose – allows your invested assets the potential to keep pace with or outpace inflation.

Retirement is the time to withdraw retirement assets. Some women (and men) are extremely reluctant to tap into their retirement nest eggs, even when the money has been set aside for years for a specific dream. Even though they have saved or dedicated, say, $20,000 for world travel, when retirement comes they may be skittish about actually using the money for that purpose. Buying a car to replace one that has been driven for 15 years, or remodeling part of the house to make it more livable after 70 or 80 may be viewed as extravagances. 

We cannot control how long we will live, how much money we will need in the future, or how well the economy will perform next year or ten years on. There comes a point where you must live for today. Pinching pennies in retirement with the idea that the great bulk of your savings is for “someday” can weigh on your psyche. What does your retirement dream amount to if you don’t start living it once you retire? 

If you fear outliving your money, remember that growth investing offers you the potential to generate a larger retirement fund for yourself. If you seek more retirement income, ask a financial professional about ways to arrange it – there are multiple ways to plan for it, and some that involve little risk to principal.

Don’t forget America’s built-in retirement insurance: Social Security. For every year you wait to claim Social Security benefits after your full retirement age (either 66 and 67 for most people) and age 70, your monthly payments grow by 8%. In contrast, if you start taking Social Security before your full retirement age, it will mean less SSI per month than if you had waited.1

The 4% rule may provide you with a guideline. For many years, some retirement planners have recommended that a retiree withdraw between 4-4.5% annually from savings. (This percentage is gradually adjusted north for inflation over the years.)2

The 4% rule is a worthwhile rule for many retirees, but it is hardly the only yardstick for retirement income withdrawals. At its Squared Away blog, the influential Center for Retirement Research at Boston College notes a study from one of its economists on this topic. It suggests an alternative – termed the RMD strategy – that mimics the Required Minimum Distributions the federal government requires from a traditional IRA after the original IRA owner enters his or her seventies. In this withdrawal strategy, you start withdrawing only 3.1% of your retirement assets at age 65, which climbs to 4.4% at 75 and then 6.8% by 85. (That is just withdrawal off of principal; interest and dividends can be added to that to give you more income.)2   

Are you wondering just how much money to live on in retirement? Are you also wondering how your retirement savings and income may grow? Talk with a financial professional about your options – you may have many more than you initially assume. A practical outlook on investing and decisions to work longer or claim Social Security later can also potentially help you amass or receive more money for the years ahead. 

This material was prepared by MarketingLibrary.Net Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. 

Citations.

1 – forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2013/08/22/5-cures-for-womens-retirement-spending-paralysis/ [8/22/13]

2 – squaredawayblog.bc.edu/squared-away/retiree-paralysis-can-i-spend-my-money/ [7/11/13]

Albert Aizin is a Representative with FSC Securities and may be reached at http://www.theretirementgroup.com. 

The Retirement Group is not affiliated with nor endorsed by fidelity.com, netbenefits.fidelity.com, hewitt.com, resources.hewitt.com, access.att.com, Verizon, Merck, Glaxosmithkline, Bank of America, Chevron, Hughes, Qwest, ExxonMobil, AT&T, Raytheon, Pfizer, ING Retirement, Northrop Grumman, Alcatel-Lucent or by your employer. We are an independent financial advisory group that specializes in transition planning and lump sum distribution. Please call our office at 800-900-5867 if you have additional questions or need help in the retirement planning process. 

 

This material was prepared by Peter Montoya Inc, and does not necessarily represent the views of Albert Aizin and The Retirement Group or FSC Financial Corp. This information should not be construed as investment advice. Neither the named Representatives nor Broker/Dealer gives tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If other expert assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. Please consult your Financial Advisor for further information or call 800-900-5867. 

How Much Health Care Reform Will Be Seen By 2014?

How Much Health Care Reform Will We See By 2014?

Can the federal government follow through on its ambitions?

In 2014, we were supposed to see profound health care reform per the 2011 Affordable Care Act – but how much of that reform will roll out on time?

The federal government has already conceded that it can’t enforce the employer mandate portion of the Affordable Care Act by 2014. On July 2, the Obama administration gave businesses with 50 or more employees a 1-year reprieve from having to provide affordable health insurance to full-time employees (people working 30 or more hours weekly).1,2

So how about the state health insurance exchanges that are scheduled to be up and running by October 1? How about the planned expansion of Medicaid? Will these reforms also be delayed? The House of Representatives has scheduled a mid-July vote to attempt to do just that. Lastly, do small businesses have any enthusiasm about health care reform?3

What’s the progress on the state exchanges? The progress report isn’t good. As the Wall Street Journal noted last month, even the Government Accountability Office thinks that a “timely and smooth implementation of the exchanges by October 2013 cannot yet be determined.4

Small businesses and the self-employed are supposed to be able to find affordable coverage through these online marketplaces. The small business exchange rollout has already encountered glitches. In some states, only one insurance carrier has shown interest in them; the state of Washington is simply postponing its exchange because no carrier wanted to provide small business plans statewide. In 2014, businesses will be asked to select and offer one insurance plan from the exchanges to their workers. In the initial conception, they could elect to offer employees multiple insurance options. The federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services are overseeing the implementation of the individual exchanges in 33 states; 17 other states and the District of Columbia are setting up their own exchanges.4

Individual exchanges in 34 states will be created via the federal government – but on July 5, it quietly granted another concession. The Department of Health and Human Services relaxed a requirement for the 16 other states and the District of Columbia to verify the income and health coverage status of applicants to those individual exchanges. These 17 exchanges will only check the income eligibility of applicants at random next year, and they will wait until 2015 to check if applicants are getting employer-sponsored health benefits.5

The WSJ learned that states running their own exchanges had missed, on average, 44% of the interim deadlines for these projects through the end of March. Still, DHHS chief technology officer Todd Park told CNBC that the state exchanges are “on track” and will allow open enrollment beginning October 1.4,6

Where do things stand state-by-state with the Medicaid expansion? Just 23 states and the District of Columbia have signed up for it. (You’ll recall that the Supreme Court allowed states to opt out of it when it ruled that the ACA was constitutional in 2012.) In these states and in Washington D.C., those with earnings of up to 138% of the federal poverty level may qualify for Medicaid (that works out to earnings of $15,856 for an individual and $32,499 for a family of four). The expansion of Medicaid in these states doesn’t require the federal government to recreate the wheel, but delays could happen in other ways. In Michigan, for example, state legislators have passed their own version of a Medicaid expansion requiring a 90-day federal review process, which will put Michigan weeks behind in enrolling participants in expanded Medicaid coverage.6,7

Do employers even care about the ACA’s incentives? The ACA opens the door for employers to markedly increase the percentage of employee benefits represented by wellness incentives. Yet in a survey of 1,000+ employers conducted by Virgin HealthMiles and Workforce Magazine, just 25.8% of companies surveyed said they intended to draw on wellness provisions of the ACA to enhance employee health benefit offerings. A lack of information about such incentives may be a factor here for both employers and employees. In fact, the survey also polled almost 10,000 workers at these companies and found that while 87.2% looked at health and wellness packages when considering a job, half of the respondents said they were “not aware of, or need to know more about, health and wellness programs offered by employers.”8

Frankly, what’s to get excited about? An analysis from insurance consulting firm Millman says that individual premiums could grow 25-40% costlier due to the ACA with small market group premiums rising 6-12%. On the other hand, Humana estimates that by renewing individual and group health plans before 2014, a workplace with predominantly younger and healthier employees could see rates rise by 15% or less. Unsurprisingly, a number of major carriers are expected to offer early renewals.9

President Obama noted the possibility of “glitches and bumps” along the way to the ACA’s full implementation. They are evident now.

This material was prepared by MarketingLibrary.Net Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Citations.

1 – kansascity.com/2013/07/03/4328512/qa-on-impact-of-health-law-delay.html [7/3/13]

2 – money.cnn.com/2013/07/03/smallbusiness/obamacare-employer-mandate/index.html [7/3/13]

3 – abcnews.go.com/blogs/politics/2013/07/house-to-vote-next-week-to-delay-individual-mandate/ [7/11/13]

4 – online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324520904578553871314315986.html [6/19/13]

5 – reuters.com/article/2013/07/08/us-usa-healthcare-obamacare-idUSBRE96700R20130708 [7/8/13]

6 – webmd.com/health-insurance/news/20130711/is-us-health-care-reform-on-track-for-2014 [7/11/13]

7 – lansingstatejournal.com/article/20130707/NEWS04/307070073/Clock-ticking-Michigan-Medicaid-expansion [7/7/13]

8 – benefitspro.com/2013/06/03/employers-ignoring-ppaca-wellness-incentives [6/3/13]

9 – benefitspro.com/2013/05/31/putting-off-ppaca-with-early-plan-renewals#.UdQRNFW13Vk.email [5/31/13]

The Retirement Group is not affiliated with nor endorsed by fidelity.com, netbenefits.fidelity.com, hewitt.com, resources.hewitt.com, access.att.com, Pfizer,  Northrop Grumman, Hughes, Glaxosmithkline, Qwest, Verizon, AT&T,  ExxonMobil, Bank of America,  Merck,  ING Retirement, Raytheon,  Chevron, Alcatel-Lucent, or by your employer. We are an independent financial advisory group that specializes in transition planning and lump sum distribution. Please call our office at 800-900-5867 if you have additional questions or need help in the retirement planning process.

Albert Aizin is a Representative with FSC Securities and maybe reached at http://www.theretirementgroup.com.

This material was prepared by Peter Montoya Inc, and does not necessarily represent the views of Albert Aizin, and The Retirement Group or FSC Financial Corp. This information should not be construed as investment advice. Neither the named Representatives nor Broker/Dealer gives tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If other expert assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. Please consult your Financial Advisor for further information or call 800-900-5867.

 

Is Withdrawing From IRAs Last The Best Approach?

Conventional wisdom says yes, but there are exceptions.

   

Shouldn’t you delay IRA distributions for as long as you can? According to conventional retirement planning wisdom, you should structure your retirement withdrawals so that money comes out of your taxable accounts first, then your tax-deferred accounts, and then finally your tax-free accounts. Roughly speaking, that means withdrawing income from investment funds, CDs, money market accounts and bank accounts before taking a dime from your IRAs.

 

The wisdom behind this is easy to discern. By postponing withdrawals from a traditional IRA and/or Roth IRA for as long as possible, you give the assets in those tax-advantaged accounts even more time to grow. You have to take required minimum distributions from a traditional IRA after age 70½, of course; if you have a Roth IRA, RMD rules are inapplicable while you are alive.1

Or should you disregard that approach? Under certain circumstances, it may be a good idea to tap your IRA(s) in the early stages of retirement. While it may seem unconventional, making IRA withdrawals in your 60s might potentially help you enhance your wealth in the long term.

 

How, exactly? If you start drawing down the assets in your traditional IRA before age 70½, your RMDs could eventually be smaller than they would be otherwise. Smaller RMDs mean less taxable income. Not only that, a smaller RMD might keep you in a lower income tax bracket; welcome relief if you have a large traditional IRA.

Can exemptions & deductions shelter the income? A study from Rider University in New Jersey sees merit in this unconventional strategy. In the big picture, the researchers at Rider feel it may help seniors to level out annoying fluctuations in adjusted gross income and taxable income over the long run.2

 

The key: sheltering some or all of the early IRA withdrawals with IRS standard deductions and personal exemptions. As an example, take a married couple in which both spouses are at least age 65. The spouses have done their homework and determined that their IRS deductions and exemptions will add up to (at least) $21,800 for 2012. If their taxable income before any IRA withdrawal would fall below $21,800, they could use “withdrawals from tax-deferred IRAs to create tax-free income,” according to Alan Sumutka, one of the researchers behind the Rider study.2

 

The Rider study compared 15 model scenarios. Each one used a hypothetical married couple (both 65-year-olds) retiring in 2013 with $2 million in investable assets, $80,000 in current living expenses and $30,000 arriving from Social Security. Within the mock $2 million portfolio, 70% of the assets were held in traditional IRAs, 20% in taxable accounts and the rest in Roth IRAs. The portfolio returned a steady 6% annually (again, these were model scenarios).2

 

What was the most tax-efficient model scenario in the bunch? It played out as follows: from age 65 to age 70, the couple drew down their traditional IRAs right to the limit of their combined deductions and exemptions. Then, they reached into their taxable accounts for the balance of the money needed to meet that $80,000 in expenses, incurring taxes of up to 15% on long-term gains. They didn’t tap their Roth IRAs.2

 

After age 70½, they altered their approach: they took required distributions from their traditional IRAs, withdrew money from taxable accounts until those were exhausted, and then they turned to Roth accounts with the remaining balances on the traditional IRAs representing the last of their retirement savings.2

 

After all that, the hypothetical couple still had $1.61 million in their portfolio at age 95. The conventional withdrawal strategy (taxable accounts first, then tax-deferred accounts, then tax-free accounts) left them with just $1.17 million at that age, and it also led to them spending 23 years in the 25% tax bracket.2

 

The Rider study found that this approach was ill-suited to very large portfolios (ones with assets above $8 million) and portfolios with roughly 50% in taxable assets. It was also a bad fit for couples with sizable taxable pensions.2

 

It is worthwhile to review your retirement assumptions. As the American vision of retirement has changed in the last generation, so have retirement planning precepts. The recession and the financial pressures facing the baby boomers have upended some of the conventional thinking. A talk with a retirement planner may lead you toward some new financial options and some good ideas worth exploring.

 

This material was prepared by MarketingLibrary.Net Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. Marketing Library.Net Inc. is not affiliated with any broker or brokerage firm that may be providing this information to you. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is not a solicitation or a recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

   

 

Citations.

1 – http://www.irs.gov/Retirement-Plans/Retirement-Plans-FAQs-regarding-Required-Minimum-Distributions#3 [8/2/12]

2 – money.msn.com/retirement-plan/when-should-you-tap-your-iras [11/16/12]

 

The Retirement Group is not affiliated with nor endorsed by fidelity.com, resources.hewitt.com, Hughes, Bank of America, Glaxosmithkline, Northrop Grumman, ING Retirement, Verizon, netbenefits.fidelity.com, hewitt.com, Pfizer, Raytheon, Merck, AT&T, ChevronQwestExxonMobil, access.att.com, Alcatel-Lucent or by your employer. We are an independent financial advisory group that specializes in transition planning and lump sum distribution. Please call our office at 800-900-5867 if you have additional questions or need help in the retirement planning process.

This material was prepared by Peter Montoya Inc, and does not necessarily represent the views of Albert Aizin, and The Retirement Group or FSC Financial Corp. This information should not be construed as investment advice. Neither the named Representatives nor Broker/Dealer gives tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If other expert assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. Please consult your Financial Advisor for further information or call 800-900-5867.

Albert Aizin is a Representative with FSC Securities and may be reached athttp://www.theretirementgroup.com.

Weekly Economic Update 6/3

June 3, 2013

    

CONSUMERS UPBEAT IN MAY, SPEND LESS IN APRIL

Consumer spending slipped 0.2% in April, with a 4.4% drop in purchases of gas, electricity and other energy goods and services being a major influence. In better news, the Commerce Department noted a 3.4% rise in personal spending in Q1, and the two most-watched consumer confidence gauges beat consensus forecasts last week. The Conference Board’s May survey came in at 76.2, topping the 72.5 projected by analysts polled by Briefing.com. The final May consumer sentiment survey from the University of Michigan rose to 84.5; the same group of forecasters had projected it at 82.5.1,2

  

HOME PRICES GAIN NEARLY 11% IN A YEAR

To be precise, 10.9%: that was the 12-month improvement across 20 cities noted in the March edition of the S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Index. In other housing news, the National Association of Realtors announced a 1.5% rise in pending home sales for April, bringing the annualized gain to 7.0%.3

    

AN UPDATE ON MEDICARE’S LONG-TERM HEALTH

Last week saw the release of the 2013 Medicare and Social Security trustee reports. While Social Security is still projected for a shortfall in 2033, Medicare’s board now forecasts that the program can run until 2026 without depleting its trust fund, citing projected savings from the Affordable Care Act. That is two years longer than previously projected. Friday, Health & Human Services secretary Kathleen Sebelius said she did not foresee an increase in Medicare Part B premiums in 2014.4

   

S&P 500 NOTCHES 7-MONTH WINNING STREAK

Even though it sank 1.14% for the week, the broad U.S. benchmark gained 2.08% for May, ending the month at 1,630.74. While the Dow (-1.23% to 15,115.57) and NASDAQ (-0.09% to 3,455.91) didn’t advance last week either, they respectively gained 1.86% and 3.82% last month.5

    

THIS WEEK: ISM’s May manufacturing PMI arrives Monday, plus Commerce Department figures on May auto sales. Tuesday, Dollar General announces Q1 earnings. Wednesday, ISM’s May service sector index comes out along with the May ADP employment report, a new Federal Reserve Beige Book and data on April factory orders; Q1 results arrive from Hovnanian and VeriFone. On Thursday, the Bank of England and European Central Bank wrap up policy meetings, and the May Challenger job cuts report comes out along with initial unemployment claims data and earnings from Ann and JM Smucker. Friday, the Labor Department releases the May employment report.

  

% CHANGE

Y-T-D

1-YR CHG

5-YR AVG

10-YR AVG

DJIA

+15.35

+21.96

+3.92

+7.08

NASDAQ

+14.45

+22.23

+7.40

+11.65

S&P 500

+14.34

+24.45

+3.29

+6.92

REAL YIELD

5/31 RATE

1 YR AGO

5 YRS AGO

10 YRS AGO

10 YR TIPS

-0.05%

-0.50%

1.58%

1.77%

 

Sources: cnbc.com, bigcharts.com, treasury.gov – 5/31/135,6,7,8

Indices are unmanaged, do not incur fees or expenses, and cannot be invested into directly.

These returns do not include dividends.

«RepresentativeDisclosure»

 

This material was prepared by MarketingLibrary.Net Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. Marketing Library.Net Inc. is not affiliated with any broker or brokerage firm that may be providing this information to you. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general. It is not possible to invest directly in an index. NYSE Group, Inc. (NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or ArcaEx®, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world’s largest physical commodity futures exchange and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading conducted through two divisions – the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum, and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade. Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.  Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. Market indices discussed are unmanaged. Investors cannot invest in unmanaged indices. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

 

Citations.

1 – latimes.com/business/money/la-fi-mo-personal-income-consumer-spending-economy-20130531,0,3433990.story [5/31/13]

2 – briefing.com/investor/calendars/economic/2013/05/27-31 [5/31/13]

3 – foxbusiness.com/news/2013/05/28/case-shiller-us-home-prices-rise-again-in-march/ [5/28/13]

4 – money.usnews.com/money/blogs/the-best-life/2013/05/31/social-security-deficit-outlook-remains-unchanged [5/31/13]

5 – cnbc.com/id/100779852 [5/31/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=5%2F31%2F12&x=0&y=0 [5/31/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=5%2F31%2F12&x=0&y=0 [5/31/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=5%2F31%2F12&x=0&y=0 [5/31/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=5%2F30%2F08&x=0&y=0 [5/31/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=5%2F30%2F08&x=0&y=0 [5/31/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=5%2F30%2F08&x=0&y=0 [5/31/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=5%2F30%2F03&x=0&y=0 [5/31/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=5%2F30%2F03&x=0&y=0 [5/31/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=5%2F30%2F03&x=0&y=0 [5/31/13]

7 – treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyield [5/31/13]

8 – treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyieldAll [5/31/13]

The Retirement Group is not affiliated with nor endorsed by fidelity.com, resources.hewitt.com, Hughes, Bank of America, Glaxosmithkline, Northrop Grumman, ING Retirement, Verizon, netbenefits.fidelity.com, hewitt.com, Pfizer, Raytheon, Merck, AT&T, ChevronQwestExxonMobil, access.att.com, Alcatel-Lucent or by your employer. We are an independent financial advisory group that specializes in transition planning and lump sum distribution. Please call our office at 800-900-5867 if you have additional questions or need help in the retirement planning process.

This material was prepared by Peter Montoya Inc, and does not necessarily represent the views of Timothy Lynott, and The Retirement Group or FSC Financial Corp. This information should not be construed as investment advice. Neither the named Representatives nor Broker/Dealer gives tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If other expert assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. Please consult your Financial Advisor for further information or call 800-900-5867.

Timothy Lynott is a Representative with FSC Securities and may be reached athttp://www.theretirementgroup.com.

Weekly Economic Update 5/20

May 20, 2013

    

SUBDUED INFLATION IN APRIL

Consumer and producer prices retreated last month. The federal government’s Consumer Price Index fell 0.4%, a monthly descent unseen since December 2008; the Producer Price Index declined 0.7%, its biggest monthly drop in three years. Consumer prices also fell for a second straight month; the last time that happened was in late 2008. The core CPI did rise 0.1% in April; the yearly gain in the overall CPI was just 1.1%.1

THREE MORE POSITIVE SIGNS FOR THE ECONOMY

The University of Michigan’s initial May consumer sentiment survey came in at 83.7 – its highest level since July 2007, 7.3 points above the final April mark. After falling 0.2% for March, the Conference Board’s index of U.S. leading indicators rose 0.6% for April. Census Bureau data showed retail sales ticking up 0.1% in April and 3.7% in the past year.2,3

HOUSING STARTS PLUNGE, BUILDING PERMITS SOAR

While the year-over-year increase was 13.1%, housing starts plummeted 16.5% in April, largely due to a 37.8% drop in apartment starts. On the other hand,  last month brought a 14.3% rise in building permits … marked by a 40.6% jump in permits for apartment construction.4

BULLS KEEP RUNNING

The S&P 500 is now on a 4-week winning streak. It rose another 1.98% last week to settle at 1,666.12 Friday. Complementing that 5-day gain, the NASDAQ went +1.82% last week while the DJIA went +1.56%; at Friday’s closing bell, the NASDAQ settled at 3,498.97 and the Dow at 15,354.40. A truly impressive factoid: the NASDAQ and S&P have gained 1% or more in each of the past four weeks.5

THIS WEEK: Monday brings earnings from Campbell Soup, TiVo and Urban Outfitters. On Tuesday, Best Buy, Home Depot, Medtronic, Vodafone, Saks, TJX and NetApp announce quarterly results. Wednesday, NAR releases its report on April existing home sales, the Federal Reserve releases the May 1 FOMC minutes, and Fed chairman Ben Bernanke testifies before Congress; Staples, L Brands, PetSmart, Toll Brothers, Target, Lowe’s and Hewlett-Packard post earnings. The Census Bureau report on April new home sales appears Thursday, along with the March FHFA housing price index and earnings from Dollar Tree, Gamestop, Ralph Lauren, Sears Holdings, Gap, Ross Stores, Aeropostale and Pandora. Friday offers the April durable goods orders report and Q1 results from Abercrombie & Fitch.

% CHANGE

Y-T-D

1-YR CHG

5-YR AVG

10-YR AVG

DJIA

+17.17

+23.40

+3.65

+7.69

NASDAQ

+15.88

+24.36

+7.67

+12.74

S&P 500

+16.82

+27.69

+3.38

+7.64

REAL YIELD

5/17 RATE

1 YR AGO

5 YRS AGO

10 YRS AGO

10 YR TIPS

-0.31%

-0.35%

1.41%

1.84%

Sources: cnbc.com, bigcharts.com, treasury.gov – 5/17/135,6,7,8

Indices are unmanaged, do not incur fees or expenses, and cannot be invested into directly.

These returns do not include dividends.

«RepresentativeDisclosure»

This material was prepared by MarketingLibrary.Net Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. Marketing Library.Net Inc. is not affiliated with any broker or brokerage firm that may be providing this information to you. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general. It is not possible to invest directly in an index. NYSE Group, Inc. (NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or ArcaEx®, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world’s largest physical commodity futures exchange and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading conducted through two divisions – the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum, and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade. Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.  Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. Market indices discussed are unmanaged. Investors cannot invest in unmanaged indices. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

 

Citations.

1 – businessweek.com/news/2013-05-16/consumer-prices-in-u-dot-s-dot-dropped-more-than-forecast-in-april [5/16/13]

2 – bloomberg.com/news/2013-05-17/u-s-stock-futures-rise-before-leading-indicators-data.html [5/17/13]

3 – census.gov/retail/marts/www/marts_current.pdf [5/13/13]

4 – latimes.com/business/money/la-fi-mo-housing-starts-construction-building-permits-economy-20130516,0,7678305.story [5/16/13]

5 – cnbc.com/id/100746158 [5/17/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=5%2F17%2F12&x=0&y=0 [5/17/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=5%2F17%2F12&x=0&y=0 [5/17/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=5%2F17%2F12&x=0&y=0 [5/17/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=5%2F16%2F08&x=0&y=0 [5/17/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=5%2F16%2F08&x=0&y=0 [5/17/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=5%2F16%2F08&x=0&y=0 [5/17/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=5%2F16%2F03&x=0&y=0 [5/17/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=5%2F16%2F03&x=0&y=0 [5/17/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=5%2F16%2F03&x=0&y=0 [5/17/13]

7 – treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyield [5/17/13]

8 – treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyieldAll [5/17/13]

This material was prepared by Peter Montoya Inc, and does not necessarily represent the views of Albert Aizin, and The Retirement Group or FSC Financial Corp. This information should not be construed as investment advice. Neither the named Representatives nor Broker/Dealer gives tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If other expert assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. Please consult your Financial Advisor for further information or call 800-900-5867.

The Retirement Group is not affiliated with nor endorsed by fidelity.com, netbenefits.fidelity.com, hewitt.com, resources.hewitt.com, Hughes, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, ExxonMobil, Glaxosmithkline, Merck, Pfizer, Verizon, Bank of America, access.att.com, ING Retirement, AT&T, Qwest, Chevron, Alcatel-Lucent or by your employer. We are an independent financial advisory group that specializes in transition planning and lump sum distribution. Please call our office at 800-900-5867 if you have additional questions or need help in the retirement planning process.

Albert Aizin is a Representative with FSC Securities and may be reached at http://www.theretirementgroup.com.

Net Unrealized Appreciation: An Untold Story

If you participate in a 401(k), ESOP, or other qualified retirement plan that lets you invest in your employer’s stock, you need to know about net unrealized appreciation–a simple tax deferral opportunity with an unfortunately complicated name.

When you receive a distribution from your employer’s retirement plan, the distribution is generally taxable to you at ordinary income tax rates. A common way of avoiding immediate taxation is to make a tax-free rollover to a traditional IRA. However, when you ultimately receive distributions from the IRA, they’ll also be taxed at ordinary income tax rates. (Special rules apply to Roth and other after-tax contributions that are generally tax free when distributed.)

But if your distribution includes employer stock (or other employer securities), you may have another option–you may be able to defer paying tax on the portion of your distribution that represents net unrealized appreciation (NUA). You won’t be taxed on the NUA until you sell the stock. What’s more, the NUA will be taxed at long-term capital gains rates–typically much lower than ordinary income tax rates. This strategy can often result in significant tax savings.

What is net unrealized appreciation?

A distribution of employer stock consists of two parts: (1) the cost basis (that is, the value of the stock when it was contributed to, or purchased by, your plan), and (2) any increase in value over the cost basis until the date the stock is distributed to you. This increase in value over basis, fixed at the time the stock is distributed in-kind to you, is the NUA.

For example, assume you retire and receive a distribution of employer stock worth $500,000 from your 401(k) plan, and that the cost basis in the stock is $50,000. The $450,000 gain is NUA.

How does it work?

At the time you receive a lump-sum distribution that includes employer stock, you’ll pay ordinary income tax only on the cost basis in the employer securities. You won’t pay any tax on the NUA until you sell the securities. At that time the NUA is taxed at long-term capital gain rates, no matter how long you’ve held the securities outside of the plan (even if only for a single day). Any appreciation at the time of sale in excess of your NUA is taxed as either short-term or long-term capital gain, depending on how long you’ve held the stock outside the plan.

Using the example above, you would pay ordinary income tax on $50,000, the cost basis, when you receive your distribution. (You may also be subject to a 10% early distribution penalty if you’re not age 55 or totally disabled.) Let’s say you sell the stock after ten years, when it’s worth $750,000. At that time, you’ll pay long-term capital gains tax on your NUA ($450,000). You’ll also pay long-term capital gains tax on the additional appreciation ($250,000), since you held the stock for more than one year. Note that since you’ve already paid tax on the $50,000 cost basis, you won’t pay tax on that amount again when you sell the stock.

If your distribution includes cash in addition to the stock, you can either roll the cash over to an IRA or take it as a taxable distribution. And you don’t have to use the NUA strategy for all of your employer stock–you can roll a portion over to an IRA and apply NUA tax treatment to the rest.

What is a lump-sum distribution?

In general, you’re allowed to use these favorable NUA tax rules only if you receive the employer securities as part of a lump-sum distribution. To qualify as a lump-sum distribution, both of the following conditions must be satisfied:

  • It must be a distribution of your entire balance, within a single tax year, from all of your employer’s qualified plans of the same type (that is, all pension plans, all profit-sharing plans, or all stock bonus plans)
  • The distribution must be paid after you reach age 59½, or as a result of your separation from service, or after your death

There is one exception: even if your distribution doesn’t qualify as a lump-sum distribution, any securities distributed from the plan that were purchased with your after-tax (non-Roth) contributions will be eligible for NUA tax treatment.

NUA at a glance
You receive a lump-sum distribution from your 401(k) plan consisting of $500,000 of employer stock. The cost basis is $50,000. You sell the stock 10 years later for $750,000.*
Tax payable at distribution–stock valued at $500,000
Cost basis–$50,000 Taxed at ordinary income rates; 10% early payment penalty tax if you’re not 55 or disabled
NUA–$450,000 Tax deferred until sale of stock
Tax payable at sale–stock valued at $750,000
Cost basis– $50,000 Already taxed at distribution; not taxed again at sale
NUA– $450,000 Taxed at long-term capital gains rates regardless of holding period
Additional appreciation– $250,000 Taxed as long- or short-term capital gain, depending on holding period outside plan (long-term in this example)
*Assumes stock is attributable to your pretax and employer contributions and not after-tax contributions

NUA is for beneficiaries, too

If you die while you still hold employer securities in your retirement plan, your plan beneficiary can also use the NUA tax strategy if he or she receives a lump-sum distribution from the plan. The taxation is generally the same as if you had received the distribution. (The stock doesn’t receive a step-up in basis, even though your beneficiary receives it as a result of your death.)

If you’ve already received a distribution of employer stock, elected NUA tax treatment, and die before you sell the stock, your heir will have to pay long-term capital gains tax on the NUA when he or she sells the stock. However, any appreciation as of the date of your death in excess of NUA will forever escape taxation because, in this case, the stock will receive a step-up in basis. Using our example, if you die when your employer stock is worth $750,000, your heir will receive a step-up in basis for the $250,000appreciation in excess of NUA at the time of your death. If your heir later sells the stock for $900,000, he or she will pay long-term capital gains tax on the $450,000 of NUA, as well as capital gains tax on any appreciation since your death ($150,000). The $250,000 of appreciation in excess of NUA as of your date of death will be tax free.

Some additional considerations

  • If you want to take advantage of NUA treatment, make sure you don’t roll the stock over to an IRA. That will be irrevocable, and you’ll forever lose the NUA tax opportunity.
  • You can elect not to use the NUA option. In this case, the NUA will be subject to ordinary income tax (and a potential 10% early distribution penalty) at the time you receive the distribution.
  • Stock held in an IRA or employer plan is entitled to significant protection from your creditors. You’ll lose that protection if you hold the stock in a taxable brokerage account.
  • Holding a significant amount of employer stock may not be appropriate for everyone. In some cases, it may make sense to diversify your investments.
  • Be sure to consider the impact of any applicable state tax laws.

When is it the best choice?

In general, the NUA strategy makes the most sense for individuals who have a large amount of NUA and a relatively small cost basis. However, whether it’s right for you depends on many variables, including your age, your estate planning goals, and anticipated tax rates. In some cases, rolling your distribution over to an IRA may be the better choice. And if you were born before 1936, other special tax rules might apply, making a taxable distribution your best option.

The Retirement Group is not affiliated with nor endorsed by fidelity.com, netbenefits.fidelity.com, Merck, Chevron, hewitt.com, ExxonMobil, ING Retirement, Hughes, Pfizer, access.att.com, Glaxosmithkline, Qwest, Raytheon, Bank of America, Verizon, AT&T, resources.hewitt.com, Northrop Grumman, Alcatel-Lucent or by your employer. We are an independent financial advisory group that specializes in transition planning and lump sum distribution. Please call our office at 800-900-5867 if you have additional questions or need help in the retirement planning process.

This material was prepared by Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of Albert Aizin, and The Retirement Group or FSC Financial Corp. This information should not be construed as investment advice. Neither the named Representatives nor Broker/Dealer gives tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If other expert assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. Please consult your Financial Advisor for further information or call 800-900-5867.

Albert Aizin is a Representative with FSC Securities and may be reached at www.theretirementgroup.com.

Economic Update 4/10

JUST 88,000 NEW JOBS?

In the wake of the Labor Department’s disappointing March employment report, puzzled analysts tried to figure out the reasons for such poor job growth. Did businesses fear the impact of the federal budget cuts in March and scale back hiring? Were there fewer food service, retail and temporary job openings? (More than 7% of Americans work in food service jobs, and temp work has made up a larger share of employment in recent years.) Was it seasonal, since hiring also declined in spring 2011 and spring 2012? Would the number later be revised upward? Whatever the cause(s), the message was troubling. The jobless rate dipped to 7.6%, but that was because of fewer jobseekers – the labor force participation rate was 63.3% in March, a 34-year low.1

ISM: BUSINESS ACTIVITY SLOWED IN MARCH

In another disconcerting development, the Institute for Supply Management’s manufacturing and service sector PMIs both retreated last month. ISM’s manufacturing PMI fell to 51.3 from the previous 54.2, while its non-manufacturing PMI dipped 1.6 points to 54.4. On the upside, the Commerce Department did note a 3.0% rise in factory orders in February.2,3

OIL & GOLD MOVE LOWER FOR THE WEEK

NYMEX crude settled at $92.70 a barrel Friday, representing a 4.7% five-day loss. COMEX gold gained 1.5% Friday to end the week at $1,575.90 an ounce but still slipped 1.2% last week.4

CAUTION ON WALL STREET

The jobs report and North Korea’s ongoing threats gave investors pause last week, and so the Dow (-0.09% to 14,565.25), NASDAQ (-1.95% to 3,203.86) and S&P 500 (-1.01% to 1,553.28) all lost ground. Still, it was only the second down week in the past seven for the Dow.5

THIS WEEK: Alcoa kicks off the Q1 earnings season after Monday’s closing bell, and Ben Bernanke speaks on stress testing banks Monday night. Nothing major is scheduled for Tuesday. Wednesday, the March 20 FOMC minutes will be made public and CarMax, Constellation Brands and Bed Bath & Beyond report earnings. Thursday brings the latest initial jobless claims report from the Labor Department plus earnings from Rite Aid, JB Hunt and Pier 1 Imports. Friday, March’s PPI and March retail sales data arrive, Wells Fargo and JPMorgan report earnings, the University of Michigan’s preliminary April consumer sentiment survey appears, and Ben Bernanke delivers an afternoon speech at the Fed’s development conference.

% CHANGE

Y-T-D

1-YR CHG

5-YR AVG

10-YR AVG

DJIA

+11.15

+11.52

+3.10

+7.60

NASDAQ

+6.11

+4.00

+7.03

+13.16

S&P 500

+8.91

+11.10

+2.67

+7.67

REAL YIELD

4/5 RATE

1 YR AGO

5 YRS AGO

10 YRS AGO

10 YR TIPS

-0.74%

-0.08%

1.18%

2.16%

 

Sources: cnbc.com, bigcharts.com, treasury.gov – 4/5/135,6,7,8

Indices are unmanaged, do not incur fees or expenses, and cannot be invested into directly.

These returns do not include dividends.

This material was prepared by MarketingLibrary.Net Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. Marketing Library.Net Inc. is not affiliated with any broker or brokerage firm that may be providing this information to you. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general. It is not possible to invest directly in an index. NYSE Group, Inc. (NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or ArcaEx®, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world’s largest physical commodity futures exchange and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading conducted through two divisions – the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum, and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade. Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.  Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. Market indices discussed are unmanaged. Investors cannot invest in unmanaged indices. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

 

Citations.

1 – http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/06/business/economy/us-adds-only-88000-jobs-jobless-rate-falls-to-7-6.html [4/5/13]

2 – http://www.ism.ws/ISMReport/NonMfgROB.cfm [4/3/13]

3 – http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/04/02/us-economy-factory-orders-idUSBRE9310HV20130402 [4/2/13]

4 – http://www.proactiveinvestors.com/companies/news/42403/oil-drops-gold-rises-on-us-jobs-report-42403.html [4/5/13]

5 – http://www.cnbc.com/id/100619132 [4/5/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=4%2F5%2F12&x=0&y=0 [4/5/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=4%2F5%2F12&x=0&y=0 [4/5/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=4%2F5%2F12&x=0&y=0 [4/5/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=4%2F4%2F08&x=0&y=0 [4/5/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=4%2F4%2F08&x=0&y=0 [4/5/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=4%2F4%2F08&x=0&y=0 [4/5/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=4%2F4%2F03&x=0&y=0 [4/5/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=4%2F4%2F03&x=0&y=0 [4/5/13]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=4%2F4%2F03&x=0&y=0 [4/5/13]

7 – http://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyield [4/5/13]

8 – http://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyieldAll [4/5/13]

 

 

This material was prepared by Peter Montoya Inc, and does not necessarily represent the views of Albert Aizin, and The Retirement Group or FSC Financial Corp. This information should not be construed as investment advice. Neither the named Representatives nor Broker/Dealer gives tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If other expert assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. Please consult your Financial Advisor for further information or call 800-900-5867.


The Retirement Group is not affiliated with nor endorsed by fidelity.com, netbenefits.fidelity.com, hewitt.com, resources.hewitt.com, access.att.com, ING Retirement, AT&T, Hughes, Northrop Grumman, Qwest, Chevron, Raytheon, ExxonMobil, Glaxosmithkline, Merck, Pfizer, Verizon, Bank of America, Alcatel-Lucent or by your employer. We are an independent financial advisory group that specializes in transition planning and lump sum distribution. Please call our office at 800-900-5867 if you have additional questions or need help in the retirement planning process.

Albert Aizin is a Representative with FSC Securities and may
be reached at http://www.theretirementgroup.com.